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  #16  
Old 10-10-2018, 03:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Green Hornet View Post
For most pan and oven size fish I use a knife like 5 or 6.

Not a snapper and not 3 kilo, but watch this guys interesting technique.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8jFC6qkFqk
Yeah I've seen cat fish anglers in the US skin like that - but I've never tried it myself
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  #17  
Old 10-10-2018, 05:28 PM
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Yeah I've seen cat fish anglers in the US skin like that - but I've never tried it myself
I saw another vid where a guy skinned a flathead fillet with his fingers and pulled the pin bones out with the skin. I tried and just tore the fillet to pieces
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  #18  
Old 10-10-2018, 05:34 PM
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I saw another vid where a guy skinned a flathead fillet with his fingers and pulled the pin bones out with the skin. I tried and just tore the fillet to pieces
I have a friend who does this, the key is that the flathead have to be super fresh. He actually keeps them alive in his live well.

It definitely works.
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  #19  
Old 10-10-2018, 07:11 PM
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Don't know if "most" fishers actually do it well...

Having worked in commercial fish markets, I can tell you that knives like 5 or 6 were most popular among guys who WERE good at it, and did it for a living.

This article's pretty interesting, and rings pretty true to my own experiences:

https://www.filletfish.com.au/info/filleting-knives

Also, I've found chefs and fishing personalities (particularly ones on TV) almost NEVER know what they're talking about when it comes to knives.
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  #20  
Old 10-10-2018, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Piscineidiot View Post
Don't know if "most" fishers actually do it well...

Having worked in commercial fish markets, I can tell you that knives like 5 or 6 were most popular among guys who WERE good at it, and did it for a living.

This article's pretty interesting, and rings pretty true to my own experiences:

https://www.filletfish.com.au/info/filleting-knives

Also, I've found chefs and fishing personalities (particularly ones on TV) almost NEVER know what they're talking about when it comes to knives.
You have a very valid point there. My choice from the available knives was number 6. This stemmed from my time as a commercial Trap Fisherman in the 80s where we cleaned snapper by the bin full on a daily basis. For larger fish we used a knife like the number 2. A butcher mate of mine also cleans with a number 6.
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  #21  
Old 10-10-2018, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Piscineidiot View Post
Don't know if "most" fishers actually do it well...

Having worked in commercial fish markets, I can tell you that knives like 5 or 6 were most popular among guys who WERE good at it, and did it for a living.

This article's pretty interesting, and rings pretty true to my own experiences:

https://www.filletfish.com.au/info/filleting-knives

Also, I've found chefs and fishing personalities (particularly ones on TV) almost NEVER know what they're talking about when it comes to knives.
Excellent article Owen

Someone needs to get the word out there - I wish I had read it before purchasing my last long flexible knife

"There is a misconception that a fillet knife should be a super thin extremely flexible knife. In all my years as a pro filleter I am yet to have worked with a single person that fillets with the type of flexible knives that are predominantly sold at tackle shops and marketed as excellent fillet knives."

The are great for skinning - but for filleting, I've been gravitating towards a shorter stiffer blade

Last edited by yellow door 1; 10-10-2018 at 09:04 PM.
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  #22  
Old 10-10-2018, 08:54 PM
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You have a very valid point there. My choice from the available knives was number 6. This stemmed from my time as a commercial Trap Fisherman in the 80s where we cleaned snapper by the bin full on a daily basis. For larger fish we used a knife like the number 2. A butcher mate of mine also cleans with a number 6.

Yeah I've been taking advice from the wrong people for way too long
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  #23  
Old 10-10-2018, 08:58 PM
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This stemmed from my time as a commercial Trap Fisherman in the 80s where we cleaned snapper by the bin full on a daily basis. For larger fish we used a knife like the number 2..
Yeah I've got pro mates in W.A. who use that style as well - I would have thought it would have been much more popular in the poll
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  #24  
Old 10-10-2018, 09:29 PM
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Excellent article Owen

Someone needs to get the word out there - I wish I had read it before purchasing my last long flexible knife

"There is a misconception that a fillet knife should be a super thin extremely flexible knife. In all my years as a pro filleter I am yet to have worked with a single person that fillets with the type of flexible knives that are predominantly sold at tackle shops and marketed as excellent fillet knives."

The are great for skinning - but for filleting, I've been gravitating towards a shorter stiffer blade
Glad you found it useful! You are right, flexible knives are great for skinning, but not much else. I suspect like any tools of the trade, the "tradies" will quite often have different preferences than amateurs.

Not only is this kind of work less effective with a long, floppy knife, but it can actually become quite dangerous:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Al1o6tLueXc

Stiff knives can also be used/sharpened to the point where they're little more than stilletos and still be useful/safe:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39h4wMxAbGI
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  #25  
Old 10-10-2018, 10:23 PM
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I have a friend who does this, the key is that the flathead have to be super fresh. He actually keeps them alive in his live well.

It definitely works.
The one I tried was straight out of the keeper net. Most likely I did it wrong.
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  #26  
Old 10-10-2018, 11:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Piscineidiot View Post
Glad you found it useful! You are right, flexible knives are great for skinning, but not much else. I suspect like any tools of the trade, the "tradies" will quite often have different preferences than amateurs.

Not only is this kind of work less effective with a long, floppy knife, but it can actually become quite dangerous:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Al1o6tLueXc

Stiff knives can also be used/sharpened to the point where they're little more than stilletos and still be useful/safe:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39h4wMxAbGI
Yeah I'm beginning to think the long flexi blades should be renamed as skinning knives as opposed to being marketed as filleting blades.

I like to cut the skin around the perimeter of the fillet to expose the flesh - then make deeper slicing cuts down to the back bone - making that initial cut with a long flexible blade is a nightmare - so I started caring a small stiff pairing knife and find the extra control very handy

It would be impossible to find one blade that does it all but marketing these long flexi blades as filleters hasnt helped me in my search
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  #27  
Old 10-10-2018, 11:43 PM
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The one I tried was straight out of the keeper net. Most likely I did it wrong.
You're not the only one whose failed to master that method
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  #28  
Old 11-10-2018, 12:57 AM
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You're not the only one whose failed to master that method
The Gurus have told me to place my whole fish in the fridge for an hour or so before filleting to firm up the flesh. Perhaps this would help, but I'm far too impatient for that.
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  #29  
Old 11-10-2018, 01:20 AM
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The Gurus have told me to place my whole fish in the fridge for an hour or so before filleting to firm up the flesh. Perhaps this would help, but I'm far too impatient for that.
Yeah mine came out of an ice filled esky - maybe the species or condition of the flathead has something to do with it - I only gave it a couple of goes so my technique might have been off aswell.

If my fillets are too round or wide to skin in one pass I just cut them down the middle and then skin
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  #30  
Old 11-10-2018, 04:01 AM
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Originally Posted by yellow door 1 View Post
Yeah mine came out of an ice filled esky - maybe the species or condition of the flathead has something to do with it - I only gave it a couple of goes so my technique might have been off aswell.

If my fillets are too round or wide to skin in one pass I just cut them down the middle and then skin
Simply butterfly the fillet Larry, much easier. Take the fillet off, remove the rib cage then run your knife from where the rib cage used to be to the tail but not all the way through the fillet. It will lay flat enough for one of those "skinning Knives" to take the skin with little effort.
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