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Old 08-01-2019, 06:35 AM
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Seized reel - No Drama - Just drill a hole in it for a DIY service port

https://www.facebook.com/fishingaust...2704095762147/

If you dont have facebook - the guy drills a hole in a seized reel - sprays in some fogging oil - the reel starts working again - then he adds a stainless steel screw to cover up the hole.

Suppossed to be good for reels that get wet on Kayaks, jet skis and open tinnies
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Old 08-01-2019, 07:45 AM
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considering it was a disposable $30 reel from Ali,why not?
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Old 08-01-2019, 08:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piketronic View Post
considering it was a disposable $30 reel from Ali,why not?
Yeah they reckon they do it to "$800 dollar reels, $1000 reels, doesnt matter". But I think its specifically for reels that are guaranteed to cop alot of spray and have to be taken apart and lubed every few sessions
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Last edited by yellow door 1; 08-01-2019 at 11:36 AM.
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Old 08-01-2019, 03:26 PM
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My stella's are so old they came with a service port which for some reason they deleted in subsequent models. I do not think i would be game to drill a hole in a reel to service it
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Old 08-01-2019, 05:50 PM
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Originally Posted by sevric View Post
My stella's are so old they came with a service port which for some reason they deleted in subsequent models. I do not think i would be game to drill a hole in a reel to service it
they deleted a service port because a lot of dumb users couldn't wait to spray different dodgy substances to a reel for a reason or without.
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Old 09-01-2019, 05:44 PM
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Heres Slaz's thoughts on the issue

Andrew Slazmo shared a post.
Yesterday at 01:00 ·

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?sto...92223430837712

Im getting tagged and messaged this video from every which way, while it's a valid option on reels from factory - major makers like Shimano who've been adding these "service ports" to their spinning reels have all but now ceased including them in on later models, even those wee little oil ports on LRB's "vanished".

Why? Simply because trying to get people to do the right thing is like 'herding cats'... Engineers are specialists in breeding in technical weaknesses into products; at no fault of their own as they are just fancy building / designer number crunchers and looking at stuff used in a perfect world... And people the owners of these built things are experts in applying every which way technique to completely stuff a thing up with the wrong approach and application of care - I mean you can stuff up a thing by applying too much inappropriate care.

So the folks at Shimano just omitted them as a way to save themselves warranty issues and also create return to base work in a way - which is good in a way also...

So back to this video of a service port hack job...

Yes I absolutely agree that doing this "can" be a good and valid / value adding exercise to a reel when done in a professional way - not as shown in the video, for a reel that's used well above what I could consider normal. The routine application of grease and oil to vital moving parts will and most definitely make a reel endure severe use and ensure its working state till the next proper full service. Hence why I plead with people just to do the minimum - it helps way down the track - trust me...

This to my other point - appreciate the point that I've worked for Inox Australia, I've been exposed to my fair share of greases and oils from a vast array of manufacturers and seen many test results and technical breakdowns - I'm not a chemist but I understand the technical findings. I do use Inox oils solely for all my reels and others but saying that I do use a plethora of greases not just Inox for other drive / idler gear applications etc depending on size of and use of reel. Using the wrong grease or oil, wrong viscosity or NLGI in any area can bring average results or wear - thus depending on of severity of use being the ultimate unknown variable in most cases... But usually using a light oil on gears in a hot environment like Australia and how most gears work will mean certain death to a reel due to the nature of the gear's design especially in a spinning reel...

The two pics attached are of my Saragosa which is a typical spinning reel (locomotive oscillator drive) and a Curado D (all bait casting reels are fundamentaly the same design). These two will be a basic show but keep in mind there are other oscillator mechanisms in different reels especially spun reels.

Spinning reels have a pinion gear and a main gear, the main gear connects to the handle and when spun it spins the pinion and viola - your flicking bents and winning bream comps... The main gear is the bugger that does all the hard work! It's applying force and shearing against the pinion - usually with a grease trying it's hardest to remain on those gears by the means of wear agents and tackifiers in the makeup of grease... A large majority of the grease like 99% of it regardless of the boutique nature or price of the grease the excess will be sheared away and flung or applied to the centre of the main gear rendering it beyond further use - hence why I loved anti reverse switches because you could recover and reapply some of this lost grease on the teeth by spinning in reverse...

Bait casting reels are a helical cut gear which allows them to stay in synchronous mesh and allow you to apply a fair amount of torque to them and they stay in a fair shape and stay relatively* quiet***... Now with these luckily there aren't as many or as great shear forces at play so grease usually stays on these for a longer period of time*. The excess is usually deposited on the inner gearbox housings or onto the clutch yolk spring stanchions due to the grease standing up after the gears have decoupled...

So with limited skills at paint if you want to give it a crack and install your own "service ports" to your reels - go ahead... But for god sake do it properly and with a bit of thought...

The blue and yellow circles are where best* to apply the service ports in general - you will need to assess any internal structural elements and reassess the location. The green line is how you want to drill the hole from that side so that it allows you to access the working teeth surfaces. The red side is the pointless end of the story... Later Shimano reels had this issue and later again the port dropped - grease wouldn't apply to teeth at all...

Bait cast reels need a different approach where the hold need to be on the gearbox cover plate and somewhere your not going to knock or grip as a screw here isn't a valid option - a painters silicon screw plug is your only option IMHO. Applying a hole to the side of the side plate won't allow the grease to get where needed - it'll just wastefully deposit randomly into the gear casing and be no further use.

Drilling a hole in the body should be done methodically - drilling it into the side opposing the main gears teeth is a futile exercise... Drilling it while the reel is together is I'm my eye's very lazy and pointless... Drilling it via disassembled and sequred squared side plate body in a jig and via drill press by a skilled user is another good idea and tapping it for the screw type helps immensely with future use and thread longevity... Using the appropriate screw M1 or 2 or M3 (Inc head type dome preferably) and measuring its length so that it doesn't interfere with the internal working parts is also a smart move. If your not mechanically minded or not sure what your doing - just don't do it...

Applying spray grease & oil of manufacturers spec if most wise if you don't have a preference for any grease or oil, and should be done so sparingly - tackle guard and quantum hot sauce is not and shouldn't ever bee seen as an option to use... If you want to avoid using a spray you can use your favourite grease for gear teeth in a hyperdermic syringe and squeeze it in directly onto the teeth a small amount at a time until your satisfied they've got a good coat.

So the exercise of doing this hack in my honest and humble opinion is to give longevity to a reel between major services - applications for this will be various and varying and more suitable for heavy work reels and those that are time poor and can use the right lubricants in their reels to gain success from a little care... Don't see this as an option to totally omit major care as this is a preventative action in between major care / routine services, or to free up a seized reel or one on the way to being seized.

I think that's enough waffling...
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